Sunday, 3 June 2012

Blacking out & speaking out



Why would a blog about sustainable destinations & events Black Out and Speak Out? Three reasons:

1. The travel and tourism industry in Canada (and that includes meetings and events) is dependent on the perception this country is home to unparallelled natural beauty.
  • Canada's tourism industry ranks fourth in an overall comparison with 11 other economic sectors, ahead of mining, oil and gas extraction, which ranks 10th.
  • Travel customers to Canada rate the country highly as: "a place with beautiful scenery, a great place to go for fishing, a great place to relax and get away from it all, a place that is very clean and well-cared for, (and) a place that respects the natural environment."
  • Between "Super Natural, British Columbia" and "Discover our true nature", our international travel, meetings and incentives brand relies on our industry's ability to deliver on the customer expectations noted above.
  • 966,000 tourists spent $908.9 million while at nature-based tourism businesses in BC in 2001, excluding front-country activities such as skiing and golfing.
  • 20,770 individuals earned $556.2 million in wages from nature-based tourism businesses in the province on 2001, excluding front-country activities.
  • $206.7 million went to government from taxes on nature-based tourism activities in BC in 2001.
  • Sport-fishing contributed $248 million to provincial GDP in 2005 and provided 7,700 jobs.
  • Canada's share of the outdoor adventure travel market is expected to grow 7.8% for US and 5% for Canadian travelers by 2025.
  • Whale watching is one of the top 5 activities requested by tour buyers.
  • $6.2 billion was spent by wildlife viewers in BC in 1996.
2. The natural beauty on which Canada's travel and tourism product is based is at risk.
3. I benefit personally and professionally from the work of dozens of environmental charities whose ability to access funding and actively participate in public consultations is essential, including their efforts to:
The designation of new funding to hamstring the participation of these groups in processes of national and global interest is short-sighted. Further, the changes enclosed in Bill C-38 are significant and should permit time for Canadians from all sectors - including travel and tourism - to understand and publicly debate their merits on a case by case basis.

Unsure? Read the bill for yourself. Have an opinion? Contact your Member of Parliament.


References:
Canadian Tourism Commission & Conference Board of Canada. Canadian Tourism Industry Benchmark Study. 
Canadian Tourism Commission. US Hard Outdoor Adventure Enthusiasts: A Special Analysis of the Travel Activities and Motivations Survey.
Canadian Tourism Commission. US Soft Outdoor Adventure Enthusiasts: A Special Analysis of the Travel Activities and Motivations Survey. 
Tourism British Columbia. Fishing Product Overview. April 2009.
Tourism British Columbia. Wildlife Viewing Product Overview. April 2009.
Tourism British Columbia Research Services. Economic Value of the Commercial Nature-Based Tourism Industry in British Columbia. September 2004.
Tourism British Columbia Research Services. Characteristics of the Commercial Nature-Based Tourism Industry in British Columbia. January 2005.

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